Community focus: The Collective Sharehouse

During the latest lockdown, Year 10 student, Olly Garner Steel, went to see what goes on at the Collective Sharehouse. The pop-up project based at the Scarcroft School Learning Centre aims to collect food and goods to be distributed to local individuals and families who need additional support during the pandemic.

Olly said “I’d heard that the Collective Sharehouse was doing a really important job during the pandemic. I’d also seen in the news and on social media that lots of people are struggling to get enough money for food and I wanted to find out what people in our community are doing to help.

The Collective Sharehouse is a pop-up service based at Scarcroft School Learning Centre that supplies food, clothes and shoes for kids, and other necessities like cleaning supplies to people that need it. They have a ‘take as you feel’ approach which provides customers with dignity as they get to choose which items they can have.

They also provide the option to create a list of items the customer would like to have. During the current lockdown, there’s a number of ways this can happen including an online ordering option and also the option for people to give the centre volunteers a list of items they would like to have.

It is a ‘collective’ which means there are many different people that all come together to allow it to work smoothly. It is a ‘Sharehouse’ meaning that people share what they have and need; some come to take things they need and others drop items off. Each time a household comes to take items or collect an order it is counted as a share, they average around 50 to 60 shares a week. This shows how important places like this are in the times we are living in now. The pandemic has made lots of local families lose part or all of their income and having a place to share without spending money is a huge help.

The entrance of the Sharehouse looks colourful and inviting even though it was a cold, dark, rainy morning when I visited! It is set out like a corner shop inside and all the items are arranged neatly in sections. Each day, the volunteers put out a list of the most necessary things the Sharehouse needs, so people can go shopping or go back home to bring things they already have and want to share.

I met with David and Diane Rowsell who helped set up the Collective Sharehouse in October last year with many other volunteers to help support families in the local area. There were plenty of people in the local community who wanted to get involved either by donating items or by volunteering.

David said he was inspired by the work of Marcus Rashford when he campaigned for better funding for children who get free school meals. David, who is a former teacher, also told me he wants to help young people understand more about food poverty and the causes of people struggling with money. Diane said they use the guiding ideas of the Sharehouse to make decisions about how to run the collective. Those principles are Service, Dignity and Safety.

The Collective Sharehouse is trying to help the community by linking up different people’s needs and surpluses. It tries to respond to the local people instead of telling them what to do. The idea is “with the people, not to them.”

I think it’s always been important to help out when we can because you never know when it will be you who needs the help. The pandemic has brought lots of our struggles to the surface and lots of people have found it difficult to pay for everything they need.”

If you would like to share or take items you need, you can go along to the Collective Sharehouse on Monday, Thursday and Friday mornings from 9.15-11.00am and Wednesday evenings from 5.00-7.00pm. They take donations of non-perishable foods and also household and toiletry items. They regularly publish a list of needs on their facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/thecollectivesharehouse. You can also contact them by email: thecollectivesharehouse@gmail.com.

Virtual assemblies 2021

Please click the links below to watch our virtual assemblies:

 

12 March 2021 – Planning your future

Please click the video below to watch:

 

 

5 March 2021Study Hard – Stay Healthy

 

26 February 2021To Infinity and beyond

 

12 February 2021Assembly message for half term

 

5 February 2021Mental Health Week

 

29 January 2021

 

 

22 January 2021 –  5 Steps to Wellbeing Assembly

 

Christmas performances 2020

The music plays on….

As with so many things this year, our Christmas performances have had to adapt to the new rules, but our students have still made some wonderful music. Well done to them all!

This performance of Christmas Star is from our Year 11 GCSE Music students.

And this video features our Year 10 GCSE Music students performing Prokofiev’s Troika. Please enjoy!

£1m sports facility formally handed over

A new £1 million sports facility at Millthorpe School has been formally handed over.

Representatives from the school, South Bank Multi-Academy Trust, City of York Council, who provided the funding, Scarcroft Primary School, Steve Wells Associates, who acted as consultants for the project and construction company CLS, attended a socially distanced ceremony to mark its completion.

The floodlit 3G artificial grass pitch is available all year round to pupils at Millthorpe and nearby Scarcroft Primary School, together with other York schools and community groups.

It has been developed through the City of York Council scheme to create additional school places at Scarcroft Primary School and helps to increase the amount of outdoor space available to the school.

Community groups can book to use the pitch outside of the school day and during the school holidays. Hamilton Panthers, York City Kick About and Bishopthorpe White Rose have already started to take advantage of the new facility.

Councillor Keith Orrell, Executive Member for Children, Young People and Education, said: “I am delighted to see that this development is already being used not only by pupils at the school but by the wider community.

“In these difficult times, all-year-round outdoor exercise is more important than ever to our children and young people’s physical and mental health.”

The pitch is suitable for junior 11-a-side football and features include energy-efficient floodlighting, along with portable goals and pitch markings to meet the requirements of a variety of different game formats and age ranges. The high-tech playing surface meets rigorous performance standards, and is expected to be registered with the Football Association as a hallmark of quality.

At the handover ceremony, pictured from left, Tim Moat, Millthorpe’s vice chair of governors; Alex Collins, Millthorpe’s business manager; David Randall, Millthorpe’s head of PE; Adam Cooper, interim chief executive, South Bank Multi Academy Trust; Paul Edwards, headteacher, Scarcroft Primary School; Nick Jones, contract manager; Stephen Miller, contract director; Jon Wells, contract administrator; Steve Wells, project designer; Gemma Greenhalgh, Millthorpe’s head of school; and Cllr Keith Orrell, Executive Member for Children, Young People and Education at City of York Council.

Pictured above: The car park at the AGP

Main photo: Phoebe from Year 11 at Millthorpe and Stan, Year 10, at their new £1m sports facility’s artificial grass pitch.

Careers Newsletters Out Now

A new edition of the Millthorpe careers newsletter is now available – there are separate editions for Years 8 to 11. They can be downloaded from the bottom of the Careers section of the website (under the Curriculum tab).

Development projects begin to take shape

Work started at the end of June on two exciting development projects.

The Artificial Grass Pitch project, funded by City of York Council as part of the expansion of Scarcroft School, will create a fantastic sports facility available for use all year round for Millthorpe and Scarcroft students, as well as children in other local schools and for the wider community. After more than four years of waiting, we are eagerly looking forward to children finally being able to gain all the benefits to physical and mental wellbeing this will provide, hopefully just as the easing of restrictions makes group sport and outdoor activities more and more accessible.

The Applefields Satellite project will provide purpose-built accommodation for Applefields students on the Millthorpe site, allowing them to integrate with mainstream students whilst still receiving  dedicated support from Applefields staff. This supports our commitment to an inclusive ethos for our school community, as well as allowing us to draw on their specialist expertise and experience.

Both projects are on schedule and expected to complete in October.

Development Project News – June 2020

We are delighted to confirm that two exciting development projects will be getting underway on Monday 29 June.

The Artificial Grass Pitch project, funded by City of York Council as part of the expansion of Scarcroft School, will create a fantastic sports facility available for use all year round for Millthorpe and Scarcroft students, as well as children in other local schools and for the wider community. After more than four years of waiting, we are eagerly looking forward to children finally being able to gain all the benefits to physical and mental wellbeing this will provide, hopefully just as the easing of restrictions makes group sport and outdoor activities more and more accessible.

The Applefields Satellite project will provide purpose-built accommodation for Applefields students on the Millthorpe site, allowing them to integrate with mainstream students whilst still receiving  dedicated support from Applefields staff. This supports our commitment to an inclusive ethos for our school community, as well as allowing us to draw on their specialist expertise and experience.

In both cases, the construction has been planned largely to take place during the summer break and is expected to complete in October.

Black Lives Matter – what Millthorpe School says

Black Lives Matter

One of our core values at Millthorpe is that all of us have the right to be treated with dignity and respect. All of us try to live up to that value every day, so when we see things such as George Floyd dying in the most horrific circumstances, and we remember the countless other black lives lost senselessly, it makes us sad, angry, and full of despair.  We understand the strong emotions we have seen in the protests globally – however we want to act for change through education rather than politics – it is where our power as educators lies.

We are proud that we try to champion those who are not treated with dignity or respect in our country, our society and our community. For example, we know our work to support LGBTQ students and our work on Holocaust education has had impact. We also recognise that for our black and other ethnic minority students and their families, there is much more that we can do.

We are sending a message to all our black and minority ethnic staff, students and their families, that they deserve dignity, respect and equal opportunity in Millthorpe School, in our community and in our country.

We are very aware that like York as a city, we are a school which is overwhelmingly white, in which our curriculum falls far short of acknowledging the rich history and heritage of black and ethnic minority people. For a number of years we have covered aspects of black history within our curriculum, and we currently teach about the American Civil Rights movement including the KKK, Emmett Till, Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King and Malcolm X. We link this to racism in Britain including work about Stephen Lawrence and the disproportionate use of exclusion and imprisonment for black Britons. When the GCSE English specification changed, we lost the study of literature from diverse cultures but we are adding multi-cultural poetry and prose back into the KS3 curriculum from September 2020. We have given assemblies to celebrate Black History month. While this is a start, it doesn’t do justice to the richness of Black history and culture globally, nor does it speak strongly enough about the experience of BAME people in the United Kingdom.

We also know that casual racism is sadly a part of daily life for many black people and is often hard for those on the receiving end to speak up about. As a school community, we need to become better at not just dealing with racist incidents as they occur, but at stamping out the root causes of racism, which we will do with the help of our students, who overwhelmingly support this aim including many who are passionate about it. We must give more confidence to both our BAME and our white students to call out racism whenever they encounter it.

We are currently grappling with the wider opening of school for Year 10 students and with early planning for September, but the senior leaders within Millthorpe yesterday agreed that we cannot let another black death, and the protests arising from it around the world and in our own city go unmarked.

We promise to act.

We will:

  • review the experience of our black and minority ethnic staff, students and families;
  • look at our curriculum, especially in history, English and personal and social education to see how we can better recognise the culture, heritage and pride of BAME people;
  • review how we can make our pastoral system even more effective at dealing with casual racism so that we can stamp it out;
  • make a commitment to celebrating Black History month each year;
  • do all this jointly with BAME staff, students and parents, inviting them to guide us so that we can make their experience free of casual racism.

We are proud that the overwhelming majority of our school community believes that there is no place for racism here, but we promise to keep working until there is none within our school, our BAME students feel safe and our white students understand at least in part why and how racism destroys lives.

Black Lives Matter.

The Senior Leadership Team, Millthorpe School

BROTHERS SLEEP OUT FOR 50 NIGHTS TO SUPPORT RSPCA

Year 7 student, Isaac Milsted and his younger brother Ruari, have been using their time in lock down wisely, by sleeping out for 50 nights to support a local animal home.

Isaac and Ruari took on the task of sleeping in a tent in their back garden for 50 nights consecutively, all to raise money for the RSPCA York Animal Home, which is struggling to keep up with costs after the coronavirus outbreak.

The boys started their challenge on April 7 and completed it last week.

Isaac, 11, said: “We’ve chosen to support RSPCA York Animals Home because we recently adopted two adorable kittens from them, and we wanted to give something back to help them continue their vital work looking after the animals in their care during the current crisis.”

All the money raised will help to feed and look after the animals staying at the RSPCA York Animals Home, and to rescue animals which may be in danger in the York area and brought into the home.

Isaac and Ruari have raised an incredible £1300 for the Animal Home so far.

You can still support the boys’ efforts by visiting: https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/rspca-york-sleepout

IMPORTANT: SAFEGUARDING CONTACTS

During times of school closure there may be instances where you may have a safeguarding concern or need some help and advice. Please find below some phone numbers that may be helpful to you.

Multi-Agency Safeguarding Hub – 01904 551900.  The Multi-Agency Safeguarding Hub (MASH) is the single point of contact for all safeguarding concerns regarding children and young people in York.  North Yorkshire Out of Hours Duty Team – 01609 780780.

CAMHS / Limetrees 01904 615300

CAMHS stands for Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service. When a child or young person’s worries, problems or behaviours begin to impact upon their everyday lives, the CAMHS team can support you by offering professional help and advice. The CAMHS team in York is based at Lime Trees

Single Point of Access 01904 615345

This is a service offered by CAMHS for those who have concerns around their child’s mental health and feel a referral is required. This is often done in support with the GP. In the first instance a phone call would be best practice so you can discuss your concerns and they can advise what the next steps should be in your case.

Young People’s Crisis Line 01904 615348

If you or your child feel like they are at crisis and need immediate support this can be sought through the above contact number or through a text service, Young Minds, on 85258. This service is provided to support urgent issues such as suicidal thoughts, abuse or assault, self-harm, bullying, relationship issues etc.

Adult Crisis Line 01904 526582

As with young people, adults too may at times need support with mental health and well-being. You will speak with an experienced professional who can listen to you and provide you with support and guidance . This service can  signpost you to the right professionals to help you further.

Advice to parents and carers on keeping children safe from abuse and harm

www.gov.co.uk – coronavirus-covid-19-keeping-children-safe-from-abuse-and-harm