Keeping the memory alive – Millthorpe students remember the Holocaust

Normal lessons were put on hold on Tuesday this week as students in Year 9 undertook a whole day devoted to remembering the Holocaust. The rest of the school attended dedicated assemblies, as the school joined thousands of people across the country in marking Holocaust Memorial Day.

The students were given special lessons run by the History, RE and Modern Languages departments to help understand the Holocaust and its impact and to consider what they can do in their own lives to tackle racism and intolerance. At the end of the day, students wrote their reflections on luggage tags, which were hung on a memory tree in the school reception, part of the theme for this year, chosen by the event’s organisers, the Holocaust Memorial Trust, of ‘keeping the memory alive’.

Click the images below to view some of the messages written by the students.

The Languages department has run a scheme of work based around the non-violent German resistance movement within Nazi Germany to help students appreciate the complexity of such an event and underlining the importance of avoiding prejudice.

“As subsequent genocides have shown, persecution did not end with the overthrow of the Nazi regime” commented Mrs Lingard, Head of History, “so although it is 70 years since the end of World War II, it has never been more important for students to learn about and reflect upon these dark episodes in history.”

Auschwitz

In RE students looked at what happened in the concentration camps of Auschwitz-Birkenau to help understand who was responsible for the Holocaust.

Pile of Victims' Shoes at Auschwitz

The History department looked at how images represent the Holocaust and how the Holocaust should be remembered.

Hans Scholl, Sophie Scholl und Christoph Probst, 1942

The MFL department showed a film depicting the work of the White Rose, a non-violent German resistance movement in Nazi Germany.

Holocaust Memorial Day is marked on 27 January, the anniversary of the Soviet liberation of Auschwitz concentration camp in 1945. It is a national commemoration day in the United Kingdom dedicated to the remembrance of those who suffered in the Holocaust, under Nazi Persecution, and in more recent genocides in Cambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia and Darfur.

This is the fifth year Millthorpe has delivered a day of special activities on the 27 January to help students learn more about the significance of these atrocities. The RE department also arranges an annual visit to Auschwitz-Birkenau and the History department has been running a series of activities linked to remembrance.

“This is another great example of our students learning something that will help them gain a better understanding of the world and their place in it; school is not just about passing exams, important as that is,” noted Mr Burton.

Millthorpe recently became the first maintained school in the country to be awarded the Historical Association’s Quality Mark. This accolade is given to schools that are judged to be outstanding in the quality of their history teaching, the breadth of their curriculum, the opportunities for enrichment and the leadership of the department.

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Quiz Night – Friday 27 February 2015

Don’t let the dark days of January loom over you!  Instead, think ahead to one of the most popular PTA events of the year – The Friends of Millthorpe Quiz Night.

This year’s quiz is taking place on Friday 27 February from 7 to 11pm.  Tickets cost £5 per person and there is a licensed bar.  It is a great event which sells out every year.

To be in with a chance of winning why not organise tickets for a group of the best brains you know or simply come along and join the table that looks most like contestants off University Challenge.

It doesn’t matter whether you come on your own or part of a group as it’s a very friendly event!

We have two ways for you to buy your tickets:

Do you use ParentPay to pay for your child’s school dinners?  If you do then follow this link to ParentPay to pay for your tickets. Just insert your usual log in credentials.  You’ll find the option to purchase tickets under the school meals for Millthorpe School.

Tickets can also be bought from the school office. If paying by cheque please make payable to Friends of Millthorpe.

Astrophysicist

Qualifications

A-Levels
Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics

Degree
Astrophysics (University of Edinburgh)

Catherine uses NASA’s famous Hubble Telescope, as well as several large telescopes in Hawaii, to try and understand some of the mysteries of the universe.

“At the moment we’re trying to get funding to build telescopes up in space that are bigger and better than Hubble,” says Catherine, who was attracted to astrophysics as a teenager.

“I was always fascinated by the universe when I was at school. I also had a great physics teacher who spent a week at NASA at a teacher’s conference, and came back so enthused about space science that she inspired me to think about that aspect of physics.”

Catherine studied an MPhys degree in Astrophysics at Edinburgh University. “My degree involved lots of lectures and experiments in the labs, but during my masters, I got the chance to use a telescope in Scotland to measure the distance to a cluster of stars. This wasn’t easy as it was often cloudy!”. She then went on to do a PhD at Oxford.

“What I loved most about it was the opportunity to travel to La Palma in the Canary Islands to the European Northern Observatory and use the large telescopes there. My research used the data collected from these visits to find out how much dark matter there is in the universe.”

“Dark matter makes up more of the universe than normal matter (which is what we’re made from) but beyond that we don’t really know what it is. We do know that it’s useful though, as it surrounds our galaxy and holds it together.”

You can find more information about careers in physics by visiting www.physics.org

Architect

Qualifications

A-Levels
Physics, Mathematics, IT, Graphical Communication

Degree
Architecture (Cardiff University)

Haydn is an architect who designs buildings around the world.

Haydn wasn’t sure what to study after his GCSEs, but he knew he wanted to design buildings for a living. “When I was eight years old, I went to Brighton on holiday with my parents and saw the Royal Pavilion there; the design just blew me away- it was at that point that I realised that I wanted to become an architect.”

“I didn’t know what to study after GCSEs, so I rang some universities to ask them which A-levels I should take to do architecture – they told me to take A-level physics, along with maths and either art or design. Although physics was my weakest science at GCSE, I’m glad I took the advice and persevered – in the end I got really good grades in Physics. I now realise just how important physics is to designing buildings; for example you need to understand materials, and how they are affected by heat and light, and also how vibrations affect buildings, if there is a natural disaster such as an earthquake. If you want your building to stay up, you just can’t ignore physics”.

After his A-levels, Haydn went on to study architecture at Cardiff University and now designs building for clients across the globe. “I often travel to other countries to meet clients to discuss plans and also to meet with engineers and building contractors to make sure that my designs are being built as I intended. My favourite part is seeing an idea that I came up with coming to life. There is nothing quite like knowing that the building you have designed will last and be enjoyed by people for many years, maybe even centuries to come.”

You can find more information about careers in physics by visiting www.physics.org

Holocaust Memorial Day 27/1

Tuesday 27 January is Holocaust Memorial DayThis is a national commemoration day in the United Kingdom dedicated to the remembrance of those who suffered in The Holocaust, under Nazi Persecution, and in more recent genocides in Cambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia and Darfur.

On Tuesday, Year 9 students will not do their usual lessons. Instead, they will have three lessons in the morning run by the History, RE and MFL departments, aimed at achieving a better understanding of the Holocaust that took place during the Second World War and what the Holocaust means today. In the afternoon, they will watch a film about a young woman who was part of the White Rose non-violent German resistance movement in Nazi Germany and then write their reflections on the day onto pieces of card to be hung on a memory tree in reception.

Auschwitz

In RE students will look at what happened in the concentration camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau to help decide who was responsible for the Holocaust.

Pile of Victims' Shoes at Auschwitz

The History department will look at how images represent the Holocaust and how the Holocaust should be remembered.

Hans Scholl, Sophie Scholl und Christoph Probst, 1942In the afternoon students will watch a film depicting the work of the White Rose, a non-violent German resistance movement in Nazi Germany.

Mr Noble is interviewed on BBC Radio York about Holocaust Memorial Day and the importance of learning about the Holocaust in school. Go to 1hr 39mins for the interview: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02gvd22

ISSP Events

2015 Masterclass Programme

This year’s masterclass programme is taking a new, exciting direction to push and challenge York’s most able and interested students.

What is a human?

‘What is a human?’ is a huge question that has fascinated people throughout history which can be thought about from a wide variety of perspectives. You will choose one of three pathways in order to explore this question.

  • A Scientific Approach (may include elements of Maths, Science, Psychology, Food Technology and Computer Science)
  • A Humanities Approach (may include elements of History, Geography, Sociology, Psychology and Language Awareness)
  • Creative Arts Approach (may include elements of Art, Creative writing, Poetry and Film making)

You should choose the pathway that interests you the most and where you feel your strengths lie. This will be the pathway you study in depth during the three-week period. You will also examine the philosophy of the question and, as you are an able and interested student, have the challenge of experiencing the perspective of a different pathway.

The masterclasses will take place over 3 Saturdays in March 2015 – 7, 14 & 21 – and will run from 1.30pm to 5pm. You will attend all 3 Saturdays.

Year 7 and 8 masterclasses will take place at Bootham School.

Year 9 to 13 Masterclasses will take place at St Peter’s School.


Opinionate! – 12 February 2015, University of York

Human Rights and the Media

Are you opinionated? Are you aiming to go to university to study politics, international relations, journalism, law, history…? Do you love debate? Why is there such a debate over human rights? Do you want to learn more? YES?

Come to this session of Opinionate! Our theme will be focussed on Human Rights and the Media. Can you trust the news? can you discern fact from fiction when controversial topics are reported? Work with students studying human rights at masters’ level, discuss the issues and ask questions to deepen your own understanding. Come and learn how to critique the media and find out the facts behind the headlines.

ISSP Events Poster

For more information on the ISSP events and an application form please see Mrs Lingard.